Janey

Hopes, Wishes and Fancy Fucking Unicorns

 

Tubby. I remember that’s what my grandfather used to call me as a child. My family would spend every Christmas and Easter holidays with him, and whenever he saw me it would be “nice to see you’ve lost some weight, tubby!” in a very sarcastic tone.

The good stories outweigh (hah) the bad with my grandfather, but he did bring to light from a very early age that I was different to other children.  I was “tubby” or “chunky” or one of the many other synonyms for fat that is used so frequently. And that was very quickly pointed out to me to be BAD. If I questioned as to WHY it was bad i was given the “oh well, it’s so unhealthy!” schtick. It’s a pity I didn’t think about it more critically and asked for some unbiased studies to back it up, but hey, I was about eight at the time.

My journey (hate that term) into Fat Acceptance is still relatively new.  In the short time I have been involved with the movement however, my happiness has increased exponentially. I hope that as Fat Acceptance becomes more commonplace, more people begin asking questions. That people increase questioning the media, businesses and their government as to why its okay to openly discriminate against fats. As to why businesses are allowed to profit from diet plans that are clearly risking people’s health. And how come fat people aren’t catered to more in the fashion marketplace? (Especially if the OBESITY EPIDEMIC OOGABOOGA is KILLING US ALLLLLL! )

The  biggest question more people need to ask however, is why is it more important having people be thin than having them love themselves? If you’re naturally thin then good for you, but people come in all shapes and sizes – and that’s perfectly okay. Beauty should be in the eye of the beholder, not what the media tells us beauty should be.

 

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  • http://melissamaples.com/ Melissa Maples

    whenever he saw me it would be “nice to see you've lost some weight, tubby!” in a very sarcastic tone.

    Ugh, that is awful. Just terrible. They think they're toughening you up, preparing you for the real world by saying shit like that, but… ugh.

  • Janey

    Yeah, I don't think Rex (my grandad) was trying to toughen me up – he was a miserable old bastard and wanted everyone else to feel just as miserable. That being said, i loved him dearly. And I still love him even though he died 13 years ago. I feel pity when I think of the sad existence he must've had, if his main joy in life was cutting others down.

    Ah, messed up families. Everyone's got 'em, in one way or another!

  • http://fatheffalump.blogspot.com/ Kath

    Hear hear my lovely!

    For me it was “lead arse” and “fat heffalump” that I got from my family. They either thought they were being funny, or were projecting their shame on to me. I could never do that to a child, but then I'm a healthier, happier human being than most of my family!

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